Knowledge of telemedicine and its associated factors among health professional in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis

HumanInsight Knowledge of telemedicine and its associated factors among health professional in Ethiopia: A systematic review and meta-analysis

PLoS One. 2024 Apr 18;19(4):e0301044. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0301044. eCollection 2024.

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telemedicine is a useful tool for decreasing hospital stress, patient suffering, ambulance needs, hospital anxiety, and costs while improving the standard of care. Nonetheless, the lack of awareness regarding telemedicine poses a barrier to its application, presenting several difficulties in underdeveloped nations like Ethiopia. This review evaluates Ethiopian-specific telemedicine knowledge and associated factors.

METHODS: This systematic review was conducted using a search of several online databases in addition to the main databases, like Medline, PubMed, Scopus, and Science Direct. The writers have looked for, reviewed, and summarized information about telemedicine knowledge in the healthcare system. This study contained seven studies that examined telemedicine knowledge in the Ethiopian healthcare sector. Studies that followed the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis Protocols (PRISMA) were found using search engines. The investigation was carried out using STATA version 11. The indicator of heterogeneity (I2) was used to assess the level of heterogeneity among the included studies. The funnel plot was visually inspected, and Egger's regression test was run to check for publication bias. The pooled effect size of every study is estimated using a random-effect model meta-analysis.

RESULTS: Examination of 2160 studies, seven studies involving 2775 health professionals, and seven out of the 2160 publications assessed satisfied the inclusion criteria and were added to the systematic review and meta-analysis. The pooled prevalence of Telemedicine knowledge was 45.20 (95% CI: 34.87-55.53). Whereas the pooled factor was computer training was 2.24 times (AOR = 2.24 (95%; CI: 1.64-3.08)), computer access was 2.07 times (AOR = 2.07 (95% CI: 1.50-2.87)), internet access was 3.09 times (AOR = 3.09 (95% CI: 1.34-7.13)), social media access were 3.09 times (AOR = 3.09(95%; CI: 1.34-7.13)), educational status degree and above were 2.73 times (AOR = 2.73; 95% CI: 0.85-8.82), Awareness were 3.18 times (AOR = 3.18 (95%; CI: 1.02-9.91)), Management support was 1.85 (AOR = 1.85 (95% CI: 01.25-2.75)), computer literacy were 2.90 times (AOR = 2.90 (95% CI: 1.81-4.64)), computer owner were 1.70 times (AOR = 1.70 (95% CI: 1.05-2.76)), male gender were 1.95 times (AOR = 1.95 (95% CI: 1.32-2.87)).

CONCLUSION: The overall pooled prevalence of telemedicine knowledge was low. Gender, education, management support, computer access, social media access, internet access, telemedicine awareness, and telemedicine training associated with telemedicine knowledge.

PMID:38635662 | DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0301044

Powered by WPeMatico

Apheresis practice variation during the COVID-19 pandemic: Results of a survey

HumanInsight Apheresis practice variation during the COVID-19 pandemic: Results of a survey

J Clin Apher. 2024 Jun;39(3):e22109. doi: 10.1002/jca.22109.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic affected healthcare delivery across all specialties including apheresis. To describe the changes in apheresis service practices that occurred during the pandemic, the American Society for Apheresis (ASFA) Apheresis Medicine Attending Physician Subcommittee conducted a survey study.

STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: A 32-question survey was designed and distributed to 400 ASFA physician members on September 7, 2022. Attending physicians responded to questions about whether and how apheresis service practices changed during the COVID-19 pandemic compared with the time period prior to the pandemic in terms of: (1) procedure types and volumes, (2) patient consultation workflow, and (3) the use of telemedicine. Descriptive analyses were reported as number and frequency of responses.

RESULTS: The survey response rate was 13.8% (55/400). Of these respondents, 96.4% (53/55) were attending physicians. The majority of respondents (42/53, 79.2%) indicated that the types of procedures performed during COVID-19 compared to pre-pandemic did not change. Most frequently for apheresis procedure volume, respondents reported: no change in their monthly inpatient volume (21/47, 44.7%) and a decrease in their monthly outpatient volume (28/46, 60.9%). Prior to COVID-19, 75.0% (30/40) of respondents performed consultations at bedside for inpatients and 67.4% (29/43) performed consultations at bedside for outpatients. Bedside consultations decreased in both settings during the pandemic but were still most frequently performed by attending physicians. At the same time, the use of telemedicine increased for 15.4% of survey respondents during COVID-19.

CONCLUSION: Some, but not all, respondents observed or made changes to their apheresis service during the COVID-19 pandemic. A subset of changes, such as increased utilization of telemedicine, may persist.

PMID:38634419 | DOI:10.1002/jca.22109

Powered by WPeMatico

Individualised prediction of resilience and vulnerability to sleep loss using EEG features

HumanInsight Individualised prediction of resilience and vulnerability to sleep loss using EEG features

J Sleep Res. 2024 Apr 18:e14220. doi: 10.1111/jsr.14220. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

It is well established that individuals differ in their response to sleep loss. However, existing methods to predict an individual's sleep-loss phenotype are not scalable or involve effort-dependent neurobehavioural tests. To overcome these limitations, we sought to predict an individual's level of resilience or vulnerability to sleep loss using electroencephalographic (EEG) features obtained from routine night sleep. To this end, we retrospectively analysed five studies in which 96 healthy young adults (41 women) completed a laboratory baseline-sleep phase followed by a sleep-loss challenge. After classifying subjects into sleep-loss phenotypic groups, we extracted two EEG features from the first sleep cycle (median duration: 1.6 h), slow-wave activity (SWA) power and SWA rise rate, from four channels during the baseline nights. Using these data, we developed two sets of logistic regression classifiers (resilient versus not-resilient and vulnerable versus not-vulnerable) to predict the probability of sleep-loss resilience or vulnerability, respectively, and evaluated model performance using test datasets not used in model development. Consistently, the most predictive features came from the left cerebral hemisphere. For the resilient versus not-resilient classifiers, we obtained an average testing performance of 0.68 for the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, 0.72 for accuracy, 0.50 for sensitivity, 0.84 for specificity, 0.61 for positive predictive value, and 3.59 for likelihood ratio. We obtained similar performance for the vulnerable versus not-vulnerable classifiers. These results indicate that logistic regression classifiers based on SWA power and SWA rise rate from routine night sleep can largely predict an individual's sleep-loss phenotype.

PMID:38634269 | DOI:10.1111/jsr.14220

Powered by WPeMatico

21st century critical care medicine: An overview

HumanInsight 21st century critical care medicine: An overview

World J Crit Care Med. 2024 Mar 9;13(1):90176. doi: 10.5492/wjccm.v13.i1.90176. eCollection 2024 Mar 9.

ABSTRACT

Critical care medicine in the 21st century has witnessed remarkable advancements that have significantly improved patient outcomes in intensive care units (ICUs). This abstract provides a concise summary of the latest developments in critical care, highlighting key areas of innovation. Recent advancements in critical care include Precision Medicine: Tailoring treatments based on individual patient characteristics, genomics, and biomarkers to enhance the effectiveness of therapies. The objective is to describe the recent advancements in Critical Care Medicine. Telemedicine: The integration of telehealth technologies for remote patient monitoring and consultation, facilitating timely interventions. Artificial intelligence (AI): AI-driven tools for early disease detection, predictive analytics, and treatment optimization, enhancing clinical decision-making. Organ Support: Advanced life support systems, such as Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation and Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy provide better organ support. Infection Control: Innovative infection control measures to combat emerging pathogens and reduce healthcare-associated infections. Ventilation Strategies: Precision ventilation modes and lung-protective strategies to minimize ventilator-induced lung injury. Sepsis Management: Early recognition and aggressive management of sepsis with tailored interventions. Patient-Centered Care: A shift towards patient-centered care focusing on psychological and emotional well-being in addition to medical needs. We conducted a thorough literature search on PubMed, EMBASE, and Scopus using our tailored strategy, incorporating keywords such as critical care, telemedicine, and sepsis management. A total of 125 articles meeting our criteria were included for qualitative synthesis. To ensure reliability, we focused only on articles published in the English language within the last two decades, excluding animal studies, in vitro/molecular studies, and non-original data like editorials, letters, protocols, and conference abstracts. These advancements reflect a dynamic landscape in critical care medicine, where technology, research, and patient-centered approaches converge to improve the quality of care and save lives in ICUs. The future of critical care promises even more innovative solutions to meet the evolving challenges of modern medicine.

PMID:38633477 | PMC:PMC11019625 | DOI:10.5492/wjccm.v13.i1.90176

Powered by WPeMatico

Telemedicine for obesity management among United States adults: A systematic and meta-analysis of intervention studies

HumanInsight Telemedicine for obesity management among United States adults: A systematic and meta-analysis of intervention studies

J Telemed Telecare. 2024 Apr 18:1357633X241247240. doi: 10.1177/1357633X241247240. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Obesity is projected to affect 86% of United States adults by 2030. Recent data show a surge to 41.9%, with the highest proportion in the 40-59 age group (44.3%). Obesity is linked to various health issues and preventable deaths. Telemedicine has emerged as a promising avenue for addressing obesity. This systematic review and meta-analysis examine the effectiveness of telemedicine interventions for managing obesity in US adults aged 40 and above. Through a thorough Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis-guided search, 16 studies meeting inclusion criteria were identified. These studies employed diverse telemedicine technologies, including video-based and telephone sessions or a mixture of technologies. The analysis reveals a statistically significant mean difference of 0.93 in favor of telemedicine interventions for weight loss. Subgroup analysis suggests that intervention durations of 6-12 months and telephone-based sessions correlate with more substantial mean differences. This study provides valuable insights into the effectiveness of telemedicine in managing obesity, emphasizing the importance of intervention type and duration. Study limitations include variability and potential biases. Customized telemedicine strategies have the potential to combat the obesity epidemic among older adults in the United States, offering guidance to healthcare professionals aiming to reduce health risks and enhance overall well-being.

PMID:38632958 | DOI:10.1177/1357633X241247240

Powered by WPeMatico

A Proof-of-Concept Model for Implementing a "Smart-NICU" to Improve Infant Mortality

HumanInsight

A Proof-of-Concept Model for Implementing a "Smart-NICU" to Improve Infant Mortality

J Intensive Care Med. 2024 Apr 18:8850666241247532. doi: 10.1177/08850666241247532. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Low- and middle-income countries face limited critical care capacity due to constraints in staffing, resources, and technology. "Smart ICUs" that integrate telehealth to augment care delivery, communication, and data integration have the potential to bridge these gaps and reduce preventable morbidity and mortality. While their efficacy has been well validated in adult populations, applications of Smart-ICU services in the neonatal population have not been studied. Neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in India using a common Smart-NICU platform, developed by CloudPhysician, utilize a hub-and-spokes framework along with locally designed technology to facilitate remote patient care in collaboration with local health systems. In this article, we investigate the operational characteristics and performance outcomes for Smart-NICU deployment from the 18 NICUs and 214 beds deployed to date. These findings highlight the potential impact of Smart-NICUs and establish generalizable principles for implementation in low-resource settings.

PMID:38632953 | DOI:10.1177/08850666241247532

Powered by WPeMatico

Integration of Telemedicine Consultation Into a Tertiary Radiation Oncology Department: Predictors of Use, Treatment Yield, and Effects on Patient Population

HumanInsight Integration of Telemedicine Consultation Into a Tertiary Radiation Oncology Department: Predictors of Use, Treatment Yield, and Effects on Patient Population

JCO Clin Cancer Inform. 2024 Apr;8:e2300239. doi: 10.1200/CCI.23.00239.

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic led to rapid expansion of telemedicine. The implications of telemedicine have not been rigorously studied in radiation oncology, a procedural specialty. This study aimed to evaluate the characteristics of in-person patients (IPPs) and virtual patients (VPs) who presented to a large cancer center before and during the pandemic and to understand variables affecting likelihood of receiving radiotherapy (yield) at our institution.

METHODS: A total of 17,915 patients presenting for new consultation between 2019 and 2021 were included, stratified by prepandemic and pandemic periods starting March 24, 2020. Telemedicine visits included video and telephone calls. Area deprivation indices (ADIs) were also compared.

RESULTS: The overall population was 56% male and 93% White with mean age of 63 years. During the pandemic, VPs accounted for 21% of visits, were on average younger than their in-person (IP) counterparts (63.3 years IP v 62.4 VP), and lived further away from clinic (215 miles IP v 402 VP). Among treated VPs, living closer to clinic was associated with higher yield (odds ratio [OR], 0.95; P < .001). This was also seen among IPPs who received treatment (OR, 0.96; P < .001); however, the average distance from clinic was significantly lower for IPPs than VPs (205 miles IP v 349 VP). Specialized radiotherapy (proton and brachytherapy) was used more in VPs. IPPs had higher ADI than VPs. Among VPs, those treated had higher ADI (P < .001).

CONCLUSION: Patient characteristics and yield were significantly different between IPPs and VPs. Telemedicine increased reach to patients further away from clinic, including from rural or health care-deprived areas, allowing access to specialized radiation oncology care. Telemedicine has the potential to increase the reach of other technical and procedural specialties.

PMID:38630957 | DOI:10.1200/CCI.23.00239

Powered by WPeMatico

The Impact Of Telemedicine On Utilization, Spending, And Quality, 2019-22

HumanInsight The Impact Of Telemedicine On Utilization, Spending, And Quality, 2019-22

Health Aff (Millwood). 2024 Apr 17:101377hlthaff202301142. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2023.01142. Online ahead of print.

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine use remains substantially higher than it was before the COVID-19 pandemic, although it has fallen from pandemic highs. To inform the ongoing debate about whether to continue payment for telemedicine visits, we estimated the association of greater telemedicine use across health systems with utilization, spending, and quality. In 2020, patients receiving care at health systems in the highest quartile of telemedicine use had 2.5 telemedicine visits per person (26.8 percent of visits) compared with 0.7 telemedicine visits per person (9.5 percent of visits) in the lowest quartile of telemedicine use. In 2021-22, relative to those in the lowest quartile, patients of health systems in the highest quartile had an increase of 0.21 total outpatient visits (telemedicine and in-person) per patient per year (2.2 percent relative increase), a decrease of 14.4 annual non-COVID-19 emergency department visits per 1,000 patients per year (2.7 percent relative decrease), a $248 increase in per patient per year spending (1.6 percent relative increase), and increased adherence for metformin and statins. There were no clear differential changes in hospitalizations or receipt of preventive care.

PMID:38630943 | DOI:10.1377/hlthaff.2023.01142

Powered by WPeMatico

A Smartphone App to Support Self-Management for People Living With Sjögren's Syndrome: Qualitative Co-Design Workshops

HumanInsight

A Smartphone App to Support Self-Management for People Living With Sjögren's Syndrome: Qualitative Co-Design Workshops

JMIR Hum Factors. 2024 Apr 17;11:e54172. doi: 10.2196/54172.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is the second most common autoimmune rheumatic disease, and the range of symptoms includes fatigue, dryness, sleep disturbances, and pain. Smartphone apps may help deliver a variety of cognitive and behavioral techniques to support self-management in SS. However, app-based interventions must be carefully designed to promote engagement and motivate behavior change.

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to explore self-management approaches and challenges experienced by people living with SS and produce a corresponding set of design recommendations that inform the design of an engaging, motivating, and evidence-based self-management app for those living with SS.

METHODS: We conducted a series of 8 co-design workshops and an additional 3 interviews with participants who were unable to attend a workshop. These were audio recorded, transcribed, and initially thematically analyzed using an inductive approach. Then, the themes were mapped to the Self-Determination Theory domains of competency, autonomy, and relatedness.

RESULTS: Participants experienced a considerable demand in the daily work required in self-managing their SS. The condition demanded unrelenting, fluctuating, and unpredictable mental, physical, and social efforts. Participants used a wide variety of techniques to self-manage their symptoms; however, their sense of competency was undermined by the complexity and interconnected nature of their symptoms and affected by interactions with others. The daily contexts in which this labor was occurring revealed ample opportunities to use digital health aids. The lived experience of participants showed that the constructs of competency, autonomy, and relatedness existed in a complex equilibrium with each other. Sometimes, they were disrupted by tensions, whereas on other occasions, they worked together harmoniously.

CONCLUSIONS: An SS self-management app needs to recognize the complexity and overlap of symptoms and the complexities of managing the condition in daily life. Identifying techniques that target several symptoms simultaneously may prevent users from becoming overwhelmed. Including techniques that support assertiveness and communication with others about the condition, its symptoms, and users' limitations may support users in their interactions with others and improve engagement in symptom management strategies. For digital health aids (such as self-management apps) to provide meaningful support, they should be designed according to human needs such as competence, autonomy, and relatedness. However, the complexities among the 3 Self-Determination Theory constructs should be carefully considered, as they present both design difficulties and opportunities.

PMID:38630530 | DOI:10.2196/54172

Powered by WPeMatico

Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices about Electronic Personal Health Records: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Region of Northern Italy

HumanInsight Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices about Electronic Personal Health Records: A Cross-Sectional Study in a Region of Northern Italy

J Med Syst. 2024 Apr 17;48(1):42. doi: 10.1007/s10916-024-02065-z.

ABSTRACT

The Electronic Personal Health Record (EPHR) provides an innovative service for citizens and professionals to manage health data, promoting patient-centred care. It enhances communication between patients and physicians and improves accessibility to documents for remote medical information management. The study aims to assess the prevalence of awareness and acceptance of the EPHR in northern Italy and define determinants and barriers to its implementation. In 2022, a region-wide cross-sectional study was carried out through a paper-based and online survey shared among adult citizens. Univariable and multivariable regression models analysed the association between the outcome variables (knowledge and attitudes toward the EPHR) and selected independent variables. Overall, 1634 people were surveyed, and two-thirds were aware of the EPHR. Among those unaware of the EPHR, a high prevalence of specific socio-demographic groups, such as foreign-born individuals and those with lower educational levels, was highlighted. Multivariable regression models showed a positive association between being aware of the EPHR and educational level, health literacy, and perceived poor health status, whereas age was negatively associated. A higher knowledge of the EPHR was associated with a higher attitude towards the EPHR. The current analysis confirms a lack of awareness regarding the existence of the EPHR, especially among certain disadvantaged demographic groups. This should serve as a driving force for a powerful campaign tailored to specific categories of citizens for enhancing knowledge and usage of the EPHR. Involving professionals in promoting this tool is crucial for helping patients and managing health data.

PMID:38630322 | DOI:10.1007/s10916-024-02065-z

Powered by WPeMatico