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Long-term, telephone-based follow-up after stroke and TIA improves risk factors: 36-month results from the randomized controlled NAILED stroke risk factor trial.

Long-term, telephone-based follow-up after stroke and TIA improves risk factors: 36-month results from the randomized controlled NAILED stroke risk factor trial.

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Long-term, telephone-based follow-up after stroke and TIA improves risk factors: 36-month results from the randomized controlled NAILED stroke risk factor trial.

BMC Neurol. 2018 Sep 21;18(1):153

Authors: Ögren J, Irewall AL, Söderström L, Mooe T

Abstract
BACKGROUND: Strategies are needed to improve adherence to the blood pressure (BP) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) level recommendations after stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA). We investigated whether nurse-led, telephone-based follow-up that included medication titration was more efficient than usual care in improving BP and LDL-C levels 36 months after discharge following stroke or TIA.
METHODS: All patients admitted for stroke or TIA at Östersund hospital that could participate in the telephone-based follow-up were considered eligible. Participants were randomized to either nurse-led, telephone-based follow-up (intervention) or usual care (control). BP and LDL-C were measured one month after discharge and yearly thereafter. Intervention group patients who did not meet the target values received additional follow-up, including lifestyle counselling and medication titration, to reach their treatment goals (BP < 140/90 mmHg, LDL-C < 2.5 mmol/L). The primary outcome was the systolic BP level 36 months after discharge.
RESULTS: Out of 871 randomized patients, 660 completed the 36-month follow-up. The mean systolic and diastolic BP values in the intervention group were 128.1 mmHg (95% CI 125.8-130.5) and 75.3 mmHg (95% CI 73.8-76.9), respectively. This was 6.1 mmHg (95% CI 3.6-8.6, p < 0.001) and 3.4 mmHg (95% CI 1.8-5.1, p < 0.001) lower than in the control group. The mean LDL-C level was 2.2 mmol/L in the intervention group, which was 0.3 mmol/L (95% CI 0.2-0.5, p < 0.001) lower than in controls. A larger proportion of the intervention group reached the treatment goal for BP (systolic: 79.4% vs. 55.3%, p < 0.001; diastolic: 90.3% vs. 77.9%, p < 0.001) as well as for LDL-C (69.3% vs. 48.9%, p < 0.001).
CONCLUSIONS: Compared with usual care, a nurse-led telephone-based intervention that included medication titration after stroke or TIA improved BP and LDL-C levels and increased the proportion of patients that reached the treatment target 36 months after discharge.
TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN Registry ISRCTN23868518 (retrospectively registered, June 19, 2012).

PMID: 30241499 [PubMed - in process]

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